The Waves. Many poets who have written of London share this opinion, and a new anthology—London in Verse, edited by Mark Ford—reflects six-hundred years of the rich and heady language that they have chosen to describe their city: its rhythm, its pace, its stench; its people, their stench. Lusty and hearty or mannered and refined, the language summoned to describe London is as diverse as the city itself. In his introduction, Ford refers to that "London thing" that makes the city what it is: ineffable, always changing, "assuming new forms for each new generation of …" /> The Waves. Many poets who have written of London share this opinion, and a new anthology—London in Verse, edited by Mark Ford—reflects six-hundred years of the rich and heady language that they have chosen to describe their city: its rhythm, its pace, its stench; its people, their stench. Lusty and hearty or mannered and refined, the language summoned to describe London is as diverse as the city itself. In his introduction, Ford refers to that "London thing" that makes the city what it is: ineffable, always changing, "assuming new forms for each new generation of …" /> The Waves. Many poets who have written of London share this opinion, and a new anthology—London in Verse, edited by Mark Ford—reflects six-hundred years of the rich and heady language that they have chosen to describe their city: its rhythm, its pace, its stench; its people, their stench. Lusty and hearty or mannered and refined, the language summoned to describe London is as diverse as the city itself. In his introduction, Ford refers to that "London thing" that makes the city what it is: ineffable, always changing, "assuming new forms for each new generation of …" />