• E. L. Doctorow, All the Time in the World

    E. L. Doctorow’s latest book, All the Time in the World, is an enthralling collection of brilliant, startling short fiction about people who, as the author notes in his Preface, are somehow “distinct from their surroundings—people in some sort of contest with the prevailing world.” In one …

    E. L. Doctorow’s latest book, All the Time in the World, is an enthralling collection of brilliant, startling short fiction about people who, as the author notes in his Preface, are somehow “distinct from their surroundings—people in some sort of contest with the prevailing world.” In one story, a man at the end of an ordinary workday extracts himself from his upper-middle-class life and turns to foraging in the same affluent suburb where he once lived with his family. In another, a college graduate takes a dishwasher’s job on a whim, and becomes entangled in a criminal enterprise after agreeing to marry a beautiful immigrant for money. Another piece depicts a husband and wife’s tense relationship, which is exacerbated when a stranger enters their home and claims to have grown up there. The collection is resonant with all the mystery, tension, and moral investigation that distinguish the fiction of E. L. Doctorow. Containing six unforgettable stories that have never appeared in book form, and a selection of previous Doctorow classics, All the Time in the World affords us another opportunity to savor the genius of this American master.

    E. L. Doctorow’s novels include Homer & Langley, The March, City of God, The Waterworks, Welcome to Hard Times, The Book of Daniel, Ragtime, Loon Lake, Lives of the Poets, World’s Fair, and Billy Bathgate. Among his honors are the National Book Award, three National Book Critics Circle awards, two PEN/Faulkner awards, the William Dean Howells Medal of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and the presidentially conferred National Humanities Medal. E. L. Doctorow lives in New York City.

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  • THE TENDER HOUR OF TWILIGHT, by Richard Seaver

    Join us for an evening of tribute to legendary editor, translator and publisher, Richard Seaver. Richard Seaver was at the center of literary life in 1950s Paris, establishing the magazine Merlin, and publishing Eugene Ionesco and Jean Genet. He championed Samuel Beckett in an essay that got the …

    Join us for an evening of tribute to legendary editor, translator and publisher, Richard Seaver.

    Richard Seaver was at the center of literary life in 1950s Paris, establishing the magazine Merlin, and publishing Eugene Ionesco and Jean Genet. He championed Samuel Beckett in an essay that got the attention of Barney Rosset, the editor of Grove Press, which helped bring Beckett to American audiences. It also got Seaver a job at Grove. The book follows Seaver from Paris to New York when, as a top editor at Grove Press in the 1960s, he went on to publish books with content that challenged censorship laws— including William S. Burroughs' Naked Lunch, Henry Miller's Tropic of Cancer and Tropic of Capricorn Son; and the French erotic novel The Story of O, written under a pseudonym. Seaver died in 2009 and The Tender Hour of Twilight is his memoir, condensed by his wife from 900 pages of notes he wrote over the course of his life.

    “It was Seaver who manned the barricades so that the rest of us could read. He was also, as anyone who reads The Tender Hour of Twilight will discover, quite a formidable writer himself.”—Jane Kramer

    “This book reminds us how much Dick Seaver is missed, and lucky we—publishers, writers, readers, literature itself—were to have had him in our lives. The Tender Hour of Twilight is as fascinating, as insightful, and as generous as the man himself.”—Daniel Okrent

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  • Andre Dubus III in conversation with John Burnham Schwartz

    Townie: A Memoir, by Andre Dubus III I've never read a better or more serious meditation on violence, its sources, consequences, and, especially, its terrifying pleasures, than "Townie." It's a brutal and, yes, thrilling memoir that sheds real light on the creative process of two of our best writers,…

    Townie: A Memoir, by Andre Dubus III

    I've never read a better or more serious meditation on violence, its sources, consequences, and, especially, its terrifying pleasures, than "Townie." It's a brutal and, yes, thrilling memoir that sheds real light on the creative process of two of our best writers, Andre Dubus III and his famous, much revered father. You'll never read the work of either man in quite the same way afterward. You may not view the world in quite the same way either.—Richard Russo, author of "Empire Falls."

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