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previous events

  • The Submission:

    A Novel

    by Amy Waldman

    Farrar, Straus and Giroux

    $26.00 List Price

    For more info visit:
    Amazon • IndieBound • Barnes & Noble

    Amy Waldman, author of The Submission (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2011) in conversation with Anthony Vidler, Moustafa Bayoumi, Nadia Abu el-Haj, and Bruce Robbins

    Public Culture presents a Public Books roundtable: Amy Waldman, author of The Submission (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2011) in conversation with Anthony Vidler, Moustafa Bayoumi, Nadia Abu el-Haj, and Bruce Robbins Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m. 20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor New …

    Public Culture presents a Public Books roundtable:



    Amy Waldman, author of The Submission (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 2011)



    in conversation with



    Anthony Vidler, Moustafa Bayoumi, Nadia Abu el-Haj, and Bruce Robbins



    Wednesday, October 5, 2011, 6:30 p.m. – 8 p.m.



    20 Cooper Square, 4th Floor

    New York, New York



    “Historical events as much as skylines, were collaborations.”



    Amy Waldman’s widely praised debut novel considers what might have happened if the winner of an anonymous architectural design competition for a Ground Zero memorial had been an American Muslim.



    The Submission poses questions about our obligations as citizens; our obligations to those we love, and to those we don’t know; to those here, and to those elsewhere; to those we have lost, and to those to come; to truth and to beauty; to ideas and to experience; to those we agree with, and to those whose views may seem beyond the pale.



    To discuss these issues, author Amy Waldman will be joined by four prominent scholars from a range of disciplines: Anthony Vidler, Moustafa Bayoumi, Nadia Abu el-Haj, and Bruce Robbins.



    *



    Amy Waldman was co-chief of the South Asia bureau of The New York Times and a national correspondent for The Atlantic. She has been a fellow at the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study and at the American Academy in Berlin. Her fiction has appeared in the Boston Review and is anthologized in The Best American Nonrequired Reading 2010.



    Anthony Vidler, Dean of the The Cooper Union’s Irwin S. Chanin School of Architecture, is a historian and critic of modern and contemporary architecture. His recent publications include Warped Space: Architecture and Anxiety in Modern Culture (MIT Press, 2000) and The Scenes of the Street and Other Essays (Monacelli Press, 2011).



    Moustafa Bayoumi, Professor of English at Brooklyn College, is the award-winning author of How Does it Feel to be a Problem? Being Young and Arab in America (The Penguin Press, 2008). His writings have also appeared in The Nation, London Review of Books, and The Village Voice.



    Nadia Abu el-Haj, Associate Professor of Anthropology at Barnard College, studies the relationship between scientific knowledge and the making of social imaginations and political orders. She is the author of Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society (University of Chicago Press, 2001).



    Bruce Robbins, Old Dominion Foundation Professor in the Humanities at Columbia University, works mainly in the areas of nineteenth- and twentieth-century fiction, literary and cultural theory, and postcolonial studies. His books include Feeling Global: Internationalism in Distress (NYU, 1999) and Upward Mobility and the Common Good: Toward a Literary History of the Welfare State (Princeton, 2009).



    For more information contact books@publicculture.org or 212-998-7866.



    This event is co-sponsored by NYU’s Department of Social & Cultural Analysis.



    Public Culture is a field-defining interdisciplinary journal of cultural studies, published three times a year in fall, winter, and spring for the Institute for Public Knowledge by Duke University Press. This fall the journal will launch a preview of Public Books, a new web-exclusive section devoted to real-time debate about serious non-fiction books, literary fiction, and emergent cultural trends as evidenced in current media and the arts.

    MORE ABOUT THIS EVENT
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