Powell's Bookstore

  • Richard Price, Writing as Harry Brandt

    Richard Price has always written brilliantly about cops, criminals, and New York City (Clockers, Lush Life, The Color of Money screenplay, and television's The Wire, amongst others). Now, writing under the pen name Harry Brandt, Price is poised to win a huge following among all those who hunger for…

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  • Megan Kruse - Call Me Home

    Megan Kruse's Call Me Home (Hawthorne Books) braids the stories of a family in three distinct voices: Amy, who leaves her Texas home at 19 to start a new life with a man she barely knows, and her two children, Jackson and Lydia, who are rocked by their parents' abusive relationship. At its heart, …

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  • Who We Be: The Colorization of America

    Race: The greatest social divide in American life, a half-century ago and today. During that time, the U.S. has seen the most dramatic demographic and cultural shifts in its history, what can be called the colorization of America. But the same nation that elected its first Black president is still …

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  • Carlos Reyes: The Keys to the Cottage

    Poet Carlos Reyes has an almost Joycean ear for the nuances of Irish speech and in The Keys to the Cottage: Stories from the West of Ireland (Lost Horse), he catches the energy and music of the talk of a rural Ireland that scarcely exists anymore. A rich, gentle humor suffuses The Keys to the Cottage,…

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  • Robert Scheer: They Know Everything about You

    Robert Scheer's They Know Everything about You (Nation) is a groundbreaking exposé of how government agencies and tech corporations monitor virtually every aspect of our lives, and a fierce defense of privacy. Scheer argues that the information revolution contains the seeds of freedom's destruction…

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  • Paul Beatty: The Sellout

    A biting satire about a man's isolated upbringing and the race trial that sends him to the Supreme Court, Paul Beatty's The Sellout (Farrar Straus Giroux) showcases a comic genius at the top of his game. It challenges the sacred tenets of the Constitution, urban life, the civil rights movement, the…

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  • Jane Hirshfield - The Beauty

    The Beauty (Knopf), an incandescent new collection from Jane Hirshfield, one of American poetry's most distinctive and essential voices, opens with a series of poems using materials sometimes familiar, sometimes unexpected, to explore the magnitude, singularity, and permeability of our shared existence.…

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  • David Vann - Legend of a Suicide

    David Vann's dazzling debut, Legend of a Suicide, established him as a literary master. Aquarium (Atlantic Monthly Press), Vann's implosive new book, takes us into the heart of a brave young girl whose longing for love and capacity for forgiveness transforms the damaged people around her. Relentless…

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  • Sarah Manguso: Ongoingness

    In her dazzling new book, Ongoingness (Graywolf), Sarah Manguso confronts a meticulous diary that she has kept for 25 years. "I wanted to end each day with a record of everything that had ever happened," she explains. But this simple statement belies a terror that she might forget something important.…

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  • Skip Horack in Conversation with Adam Johnson: The Other Joseph

    In the tradition of Russell Banks and Jim Harrison, Skip Horack's The Other Joseph (Ecco) masterfully depicts a life driven off the rails by tragedy and sin. Horack's new novel is a spellbinding, explosive tale of a man nearly defeated by life given one last chance at redemption — one last shot to…

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  • Sy Safransky

    In 1974, Sy Safransky borrowed $50 to start The Sun. As the magazine has grown, he's become a busy editor and publisher, but he still gets up before sunrise to write in his journal, publishing excerpts in a section of the magazine called "Sy Safransky's Notebook." Many Alarm Clocks (The Sun) offers…

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  • James Hannaham - Delicious Foods

    Held captive by her employers — and by her own demons — on a mysterious farm, a widow struggles to reunite with her young son in this uniquely American story of freedom, perseverance, and survival. In Delicious Foods (Little Brown), James Hannaham tells the gripping story of three unforgettable…

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  • Donald Miller: Scary Close

    After decades of failed relationships and painful drama, Donald Miller, author of Blue Like Jazz, decided he'd had enough. Impressing people wasn't helping him connect with anyone. He'd built a life of public isolation, yet he dreamed of meaningful relationships. So at 40 years old he made a scary …

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  • A.J. Swoboda - A Glorious Dark

    Real, raw, and achingly honest, A Glorious Dark (Baker) meets readers in the ambiguity, doubt, and uncertainty we feel when our beliefs about the world don't match up to reality. Tackling tough questions like "Why is faith so hard? Why do I doubt? Why does God allow me to suffer?," Theophilus pastor…

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  • Emily Nagoski - Come As You Are

    Emily Nagoski's Come as You Are (Simon & Schuster) is an essential exploration of why and how women's sexuality works — based on groundbreaking research and brain science. Cutting-edge research across multiple disciplines tells us that the most important factor for women in creating and sustaining…

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previous events

  • Culture Crash: The Killing of the Creative Class

    A persistent economic recession, social shifts, and technological change have combined to put our artists — from graphic designers to indie-rock musicians, from architects to booksellers — out of work. Scott Timberg's Culture Crash (Yale) looks deeply into the roots of the crisis of the creative…

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  • Mary Pilon: The Monopolists

    Mary Pilon's The Monopolists: Obsession, Fury, and the Scandal behind the World's Favorite Board Game (Bloomsbury Publishing) reveals the unknown story of how Monopoly came into existence, the reinvention of its history by Parker Brothers and multiple media outlets, the lost female originator of the…

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  • John Benditt: The Boatmaker

    A fierce and complicated man wakes from a fever dream compelled to build a boat and sail away from the isolated island where he was born. Encountering the wider world for the first time, the reluctant hero falls into a destructive love affair, is swept up into a fanatical religious movement, and …

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  • Matt Sumell: Making Nice

    In Matt Sumell's blazing, heartbreaking first book, Making Nice (Henry Holt & Company), our rage-filled hero Alby is flailing wildly against the world around him. It seems he is the angriest young man in the history of angry young men, and in each of these stories, we watch him run at life with a …

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  • Palestine Speaks: Narratives of Life under Occupation

    The occupation of the West Bank and Gaza has been one of the world's most widely reported yet least understood human rights crises for over four decades. Editors Cate Malek and Mateo Hoke spent the last four years conducting dozens of interviews with people in the West Bank and Gaza about life in …

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  • Kyle Boelte in Conversation with Justin Hocking

    At age 30, Kyle Boelte finds himself living in San Francisco, where the summer fog blows inland off the ocean and the landscape changes moment to moment. Amidst this ever-changing sea of fog, Boelte struggles to remember his brother Kris, who committed suicide in the family's Denver home when Boelte…

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  • Carmen Boullosa: Texas, The Great Theft

    Described by Roberto Bolaño (2666, The Savage Detectives) as "Mexico's greatest woman writer," Carmen Boullosa is an imaginative author in the tradition of Jorge Luis Borges and César Aira. With her latest novel, Texas: The Great Theft (Deep Vellum), Boullosa shows herself to be at the height of …

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  • American Reckoning: The Vietnam War and Our National Identity

    How did the Vietnam War change the way we think of ourselves as a people and a nation? Christian G. Appy, author of the widely praised and critically acclaimed oral history of the Vietnam War, Patriots, now examines the relationship between the war's realities and myths and its impact on our national…

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  • David Treuer: Prudence

    On a sweltering day in August 1942, Frankie Washburn returns to his family's rustic Minnesota resort for one last visit before he joins the war as a bombardier. Awaiting him are those he's about to leave behind: his hovering mother; the distant father to whom he's been a disappointment; the Indian …

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  • The Evil Hours: A Biography of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

    David J. Morris's The Evil Hours (Eamon Dolan/Houghton Mifflin Harcourt) is a moving, eye-opening exploration of post-traumatic stress disorder. Over a decade into the United States' "global war on terror," PTSD afflicts as many as 30 percent of the conflict's veterans. But the disorder's reach …

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  • Arthur Bradford: Turtleface and Beyond

    Turtleface and Beyond (Farrar Straus Giroux) features darkly funny stories by Arthur Bradford, the man David Sedaris calls "the most outlandish and energetic writer I can think of." Paddling down a remote, meandering river, Georgie's friend Otto decides to do something both spectacular and stupid: …

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  • Joyce Carol Oates: The Sacrifice

    Bestselling author Joyce Carol Oates returns with an incendiary new novel that illuminates the tragic impact of sexual violence, racism, brutality, and power on innocent lives and probes the persistence of stereotypes, the nature of revenge, the complexities of truth, and our insatiable hunger for …

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  • John Vaillant: The Jaguar's Children

    A gripping survival story of a young man trapped, perhaps fatally, during a border crossing, The Jaguar's Children (Houghton Mifflin) is the debut novel from John Vaillant, bestselling author of The Tiger and The Golden Spruce. Héctor is in trouble. The water truck, sealed to hide its human cargo,…

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  • Let's Talk Books: Our Favorites of the Season

    Every year we handpick our favorite books for inclusion in our Holiday Gift Guide. Join us for a special presentation by our new book buying team where they will discuss some of the hottest and most compelling books of the season.

  • Robbie Rogers

    In Coming Out to Play (Penguin), Robbie Rogers takes readers on his incredible journey from terrified teenager to trailblazing out-and-proud professional soccer player for the L.A. Galaxy.

  • Garth Stein

    Garth Stein, author of The Art of Racing in the Rain, presents A Sudden Light (Simon & Schuster), his spellbinding and atmospheric new novel in which a boy trying to save his parents' marriage uncovers a vast legacy of family secrets.

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