• Willy Vlautin

    Horace Hopper is a half-Paiute, half-Irish ranch hand who wants to be somebody. He’s spent most of his life on the ranch of his kindly guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Reese, herding sheep alone in the mountains. But while the Reeses treat him like a son, Horace can’t shake the shame he feels from being …

    Horace Hopper is a half-Paiute, half-Irish ranch hand who wants to be somebody. He’s spent most of his life on the ranch of his kindly guardians, Mr. and Mrs. Reese, herding sheep alone in the mountains. But while the Reeses treat him like a son, Horace can’t shake the shame he feels from being abandoned by his parents. He decides to leave the only loving home he’s known to prove his worth by training to become a boxer. His journey to become a champion brings him to the boxing rings of Mexico and, finally, to the seedy streets of Las Vegas, where Horace learns he can’t change who he is or outrun his destiny. Willy Vlautin writes from America’s soul, chronicling the lives of those who are downtrodden and forgotten with profound tenderness. Vlautin’s new novel, Don’t Skip Out on Me (Harper Perennial), is a beautiful, wrenching story about one man’s search for identity and belonging that will make you consider those around you differently.

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  • Keith Rosson in Conversation With Cat Rambo

    Marvin Deitz has some serious problems. His mob-connected landlord is strong-arming him out of his storefront. His therapist has concerns about his stability. He's compelled to volunteer at the local Children's Hospital even though it breaks his heart every week. Oh, and he's also the guilt-ridden …

    Marvin Deitz has some serious problems. His mob-connected landlord is strong-arming him out of his storefront. His therapist has concerns about his stability. He's compelled to volunteer at the local Children's Hospital even though it breaks his heart every week. Oh, and he's also the guilt-ridden reincarnation of Geoffroy Therage, the French executioner who lit Joan of Arc's pyre in 1431. He's just seen a woman on a talk show claiming to be Joan… but how will he find her? When Marvin heads to Los Angeles to locate the woman who may or may not be Joan, he's picked up hitchhiking by a self-destructive alcoholic painter traveling to his ex-wife's funeral. As they move through a California landscape populated with "smokes" (ghostly apparitions that have inexplicably begun appearing throughout the southwestern US), each seeks absolution in his own way. In Smoke City (Meerkat Press), Keith Rosson continues to blur genre and literary fiction in a way that is surprising, heartfelt, brutal, relentlessly inventive, and entirely his own. Rosson will be joined in conversation by Cat Rambo, President of The Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America (SFWA).

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  • Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment

    From Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States and "All the Real Indians Died Off": And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans, comes a provocative, timely, and deeply researched history of gun culture and how it reflects race and power in the United States.…

    From Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz, author of An Indigenous Peoples' History of the United States and "All the Real Indians Died Off": And 20 Other Myths About Native Americans, comes a provocative, timely, and deeply researched history of gun culture and how it reflects race and power in the United States. America loves guns. From Daniel Boone and Jesse James to the NRA and Seal Team 6, gun culture has colored the lore, shaped the law, and protected the market that arms the nation. In Loaded: A Disarming History of the Second Amendment (City Lights), Roxanne Dunbar-Ortiz peels away the myths of gun culture to expose the true historical origins of the Second Amendment, revealing the racial undercurrents connecting the earliest Anglo settlers with contemporary gun proliferation, modern-day policing, and the consolidation of influence of armed white nationalists. From the enslavement of Blacks and the conquest of Native America, to the arsenal of institutions that constitute the "gun lobby," Loaded presents a people's history of the Second Amendment, as seen through the lens of those who have been most targeted by guns: people of color. Meticulously researched and thought-provoking throughout, this is essential reading for anyone interested in understanding the historical connections between racism and gun violence in the United States.

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  • Abigail Scott Duniway and Susan B. Anthony in Oregon

    It was the spring of 1871. Pioneer entrepreneur Abigail Scott Duniway, on a business trip to purchase stock for her millinery store back in Oregon, waited breathlessly outside the suffrage convention in San Francisco. She hoped to meet Susan B. Anthony, whose career she so admired. And so they met,…

    It was the spring of 1871. Pioneer entrepreneur Abigail Scott Duniway, on a business trip to purchase stock for her millinery store back in Oregon, waited breathlessly outside the suffrage convention in San Francisco. She hoped to meet Susan B. Anthony, whose career she so admired. And so they met, sparking a relationship that dramatically altered Duniway's life. The duo traveled for months on horseback, carriage, train, and boat in their crucial, successful effort to ensure the right to vote for women nationwide. In Abigail Scott Duniway and Susan B. Anthony in Oregon: Hesitate No Longer (History Press), author Jennifer Chambers revives the inspirational fight for women's rights by examining the dynamic between these two powerful women and how they changed not just the Beaver State, but the country as a whole.

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  • Karen Karbo in Conversation With Olivia Olivia

    Smart, sassy, and unapologetically feminine, Karen Karbo’s new book, In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons From 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (National Geographic), is an ode to the bold and charismatic women of modern history. Karbo, author of The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, …

    Smart, sassy, and unapologetically feminine, Karen Karbo’s new book, In Praise of Difficult Women: Life Lessons From 29 Heroines Who Dared to Break the Rules (National Geographic), is an ode to the bold and charismatic women of modern history. Karbo, author of The Gospel According to Coco Chanel, spotlights the spirited rule breakers who charted their way with little regard for expectations: Frida Kahlo, Elizabeth Taylor, Nora Ephron, Carrie Fisher, Amelia Earhart, Helen Gurley Brown, Edie Sedgwick, Hillary Clinton, Amy Poehler, and Shonda Rhimes, among others. Their lives — imperfect, elegant, messy, glorious — provide inspiration and instruction for the new age of feminism we have entered. Karbo distills these lessons with wit and humor, examining the universal themes that connect us to each of these mesmerizing personalities today: success and style, love and authenticity, daring and courage. Being “difficult,” Karbo reveals, might not make life easier. But it can make it more fulfilling — whatever that means for you. Karbo will be joined in conversation by Olivia Olivia, author of No One Remembered Your Name but I Wrote It Down.

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  • Call Me by Your Name

    André Aciman's Call Me by Your Name (Picador) is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between an adolescent boy and a summer guest at his parents' cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each is unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer…

    André Aciman's Call Me by Your Name (Picador) is the story of a sudden and powerful romance that blossoms between an adolescent boy and a summer guest at his parents' cliffside mansion on the Italian Riviera. Each is unprepared for the consequences of their attraction, when, during the restless summer weeks, unrelenting currents of obsession, fascination, and desire intensify their passion and test the charged ground between them. Recklessly, the two verge toward the one thing both fear they may never truly find again: total intimacy. It is an instant classic and one of the great love stories of our time. Aciman's critically acclaimed debut novel is a frank, unsentimental, heartrending elegy to human passion — winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Fiction and now a major motion picture.

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  • Elif Batuman

    The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an …

    The year is 1995, and email is new. Selin, the daughter of Turkish immigrants, arrives for her freshman year at Harvard. She signs up for classes in subjects she has never heard of, befriends her charismatic Serbian classmate, Svetlana, and, almost by accident, begins corresponding with Ivan, an older mathematics student from Hungary. Selin may have barely spoken to Ivan, but with each email they exchange, the act of writing seems to take on new and increasingly mysterious meanings. At the end of the school year, Ivan goes to Budapest for the summer, and Selin heads to the Hungarian countryside to teach English. On the way, she spends two weeks visiting Paris with Svetlana. Selin’s summer in Europe does not resonate with anything she has previously heard about the typical experiences of American college students, or indeed of any other kinds of people. For Selin, this is a journey further inside herself: a coming to grips with the ineffable and exhilarating confusion of first love, and with the growing consciousness that she is doomed to become a writer. With superlative emotional and intellectual sensitivity, mordant wit, and pitch-perfect style, Elif Batuman dramatizes the uncertainty of life on the cusp of adulthood. Batuman’s The Idiot (Penguin) is a heroic yet self-effacing reckoning with the terror and joy of becoming a person in a world that is as intoxicating as it is disquieting.

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  • Vegas Tenold

    Vegas Tenold

  • Matt Young in Conversation With Matthew Robinson

    Matt Young in Conversation With Matthew Robinson

  • Patton Oswalt

    Patton Oswalt

previous events

  • Anca L. Szilágyi in Conversation With Susan DeFreitas

    Tatiana "Pluta" Spektor was a mostly happy, if awkward, young girl — until her sociologist father was disappeared during Argentina's Dirty War. Sent a world away by her grieving mother to attend boarding school outside New York City, Pluta wrestles alone with the unresolved tragedy and at last runs…

    Tatiana "Pluta" Spektor was a mostly happy, if awkward, young girl — until her sociologist father was disappeared during Argentina's Dirty War. Sent a world away by her grieving mother to attend boarding school outside New York City, Pluta wrestles alone with the unresolved tragedy and at last runs away: to the streets of Brooklyn in 1980, where she figuratively — and literally — spreads her wings. Told with haunting fabulist imagery, Anca L. Szilágyi’s debut novel, Daughters of the Air (Lanternfish Press), is a searing tale of love, loss, estrangement, and coming of age, and an unflinching exploration of the personal devastation wrought by political repression. Szilágyi will be joined in conversation by Susan DeFreitas, author of Hot Season.

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  • The Line Becomes a River: Dispatches From the Border

    For Francisco Cantú, the border is in the blood: his mother, a park ranger and daughter of a Mexican immigrant, raised him in the scrublands of the Southwest. Haunted by the landscape of his youth, Cantú joins the Border Patrol. He and his partners are posted to remote regions crisscrossed by drug …

    For Francisco Cantú, the border is in the blood: his mother, a park ranger and daughter of a Mexican immigrant, raised him in the scrublands of the Southwest. Haunted by the landscape of his youth, Cantú joins the Border Patrol. He and his partners are posted to remote regions crisscrossed by drug routes and smuggling corridors, where they learn to track other humans under blistering sun and through frigid nights. They haul in the dead and deliver to detention those they find alive. Cantú tries not to think where the stories go from there. Plagued by nightmares, he abandons the Patrol for civilian life. But when an immigrant friend travels to Mexico to visit his dying mother and does not return, Cantú discovers that the border has migrated with him, and now he must know the whole story. Searing and unforgettable, The Line Becomes a River (Riverhead) makes urgent and personal the violence our border wreaks on both sides of the line.

    Preorder a signed edition

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  • Sara Blćdel

    Already widowed by the age of 40, Ilka Nichols Jensen, a school portrait photographer, leads a modest, regimented, and uneventful life in Copenhagen. Until unexpected news rocks her quiet existence: Her father – who walked out suddenly and inexplicably on the family more than three decades ago — has…

    Already widowed by the age of 40, Ilka Nichols Jensen, a school portrait photographer, leads a modest, regimented, and uneventful life in Copenhagen. Until unexpected news rocks her quiet existence: Her father – who walked out suddenly and inexplicably on the family more than three decades ago — has died. And he's left her something in his will: his funeral home. In Racine, Wisconsin. Clinging to this last shred of communication from the father she hasn't heard from since childhood, Ilka makes an uncharacteristically rash decision and jumps on a plane to Wisconsin. Desperate for a connection to the parent she never really knew, she plans to visit the funeral home and go through her father's things before preparing the business for a quick sale. But when she stumbles on an unsolved murder, and a killer who seems to still be very much alive, the undertaker's daughter realizes she might be in over her head. The Undertaker’s Daughter (Grand Central) is the thrilling new suspense novel from Sara Blćdel, bestselling author of The Forgotten Girls.

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  • Scott Tong in Conversation With Paul Solman

    When journalist Scott Tong moved to Shanghai, his assignment was to start up the first full-time China bureau for Marketplace, the daily business and economics program on public radio stations across the United States. But for Tong the move became much more — it offered the opportunity to reconnect…

    When journalist Scott Tong moved to Shanghai, his assignment was to start up the first full-time China bureau for Marketplace, the daily business and economics program on public radio stations across the United States. But for Tong the move became much more — it offered the opportunity to reconnect with members of his extended family who had remained in China after his parents fled the communists six decades prior. By uncovering the stories of his family’s history, Tong discovered a new way to understand the defining moments of modern China. Tong’s A Village With My Name (University of Chicago) explores the moments that have shaped China and its people, offering a compelling, deeply personal take on how China became what it is today. Tong will be joined in conversation by Paul Solman, business and economics correspondent for the PBS NewsHour.

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  • Min Jin Lee

    In Min Jin Lee’s gorgeous, page-turning saga, Pachinko (Grand Central) — finalist for the 2017 National Book Award – four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan, exiled from a home they never knew. In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the …

    In Min Jin Lee’s gorgeous, page-turning saga, Pachinko (Grand Central) — finalist for the 2017 National Book Award – four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destiny in 20th-century Japan, exiled from a home they never knew. In the early 1900s, teenaged Sunja, the daughter of a crippled fisherman, falls for a wealthy stranger at the seashore near her home in Korea. He promises her the world, but when she discovers she is pregnant — and that her lover is married — she refuses to be bought. Instead, she accepts an offer of marriage from a gentle, sickly minister passing through on his way to Japan. But her decision to abandon her home, and to reject her son's powerful father, sets off a dramatic saga that will echo down through the generations. Richly told and profoundly moving, Pachinko is a story of love, sacrifice, ambition, and loyalty.

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  • Surveillance Valley: The Secret Military History of the Internet

    With each passing year the Internet becomes more and more a part of modern life. Despite story after story of hacks, malware, government surveillance, and corporate corruption, we continue to rely on the web for ever more social functions, and we largely think of Silicon Valley as a neutral, even …

    With each passing year the Internet becomes more and more a part of modern life. Despite story after story of hacks, malware, government surveillance, and corporate corruption, we continue to rely on the web for ever more social functions, and we largely think of Silicon Valley as a neutral, even idealistic, business hub. Rarely do we consider the for-profit surveillance business operating within its confines, nor do we think much about the military origins of the platforms and tools we use every day. In Surveillance Valley (PublicAffairs), Yasha Levine traces the history of the Internet back to its beginnings as a Vietnam-era tool for spying on guerrilla fighters and antiwar protesters — a military computer networking project that ultimately envisioned the creation of a global system of surveillance and prediction. Levine shows how the same military objectives that drove the development of early Internet technology are still at the heart of Silicon Valley today. This revelatory and sweeping story will make you reconsider what you know about the most powerful, ubiquitous tool ever created.

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  • Stand Up!: How to Get Involved, Speak Out, and Win in a World on Fire

    Each of us faces a moment of truth — at a time of crisis, do we stand up and speak out or retreat into our private lives? This book is for those frustrated by what they see happening in the world but not sure what they can do about it. Veteran organizer Gordon Whitman shows that we have the power we…

    Each of us faces a moment of truth — at a time of crisis, do we stand up and speak out or retreat into our private lives? This book is for those frustrated by what they see happening in the world but not sure what they can do about it. Veteran organizer Gordon Whitman shows that we have the power we need to create a racially and economically just society. But it won’t happen if we stay on the sidelines sharing social media posts and signing online petitions. We win only if we’re willing to join other people in the kind of face-to-face organizing that has powered every successful social movement in history. In Stand Up!: How to Get Involved, Speak Out, and Win in a World on Fire (Berrett-Koehler), Whitman describes five types of conversations that enable people to build organizations that can solve local problems and confront the greatest challenges facing our country — from gun violence to climate change. Whitman’s book is a road map for standing up to the bullies who’ve hijacked our democracy and divided us against each other. Whitman will be joined in conversation by Vivian Satterfield, Deputy Director, Organizing People, Activating Leaders (OPAL) and Ana del Rocío, State Director of Color PAC.

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  • Terese Marie Mailhot in Conversation With Lidia Yuknavitch

    Heart Berries: A Memoir (Counterpoint) is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman's coming-of-age on the Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post-traumatic stress…

    Heart Berries: A Memoir (Counterpoint) is a powerful, poetic memoir of a woman's coming-of-age on the Seabird Island Indian Reservation in the Pacific Northwest. Having survived a profoundly dysfunctional upbringing only to find herself hospitalized and facing a dual diagnosis of post-traumatic stress disorder and bipolar II disorder, Terese Marie Mailhot is given a notebook and begins to write her way out of trauma. The triumphant result is Heart Berries, a memorial for Mailhot's mother, a social worker and activist who had a thing for prisoners; a story of reconciliation with her father — an abusive drunk and a brilliant artist — who was murdered under mysterious circumstances; and an elegy on how difficult it is to love someone while dragging the long shadows of shame. Mailhot trusts the reader to understand that memory isn't exact, but melded to imagination, pain, and what we can bring ourselves to accept. Her unique and at times unsettling voice graphically illustrates her mental state. As she writes, Mailhot discovers her own true voice, seizes control of her story, and, in so doing, reestablishes her connection to her family, to her people, and to her place in the world. Mailhot will be joined in conversation by Lidia Yuknavitch, author of The Book of Joan and The Misfit’s Manifesto.

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  • Scarlet: Performances From Portland Playhouse's New Musical

    Funny, sweet, and heroic, Scarlet is a new musical based on Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, featuring Portland favorites Susannah Mars, Isaac Lamb, Darius Pierce, Dana Green, Rebecca Teran, and many more. Join us for a performance followed by a Q&A with cast members, creator Michelle Horgen,…

    Funny, sweet, and heroic, Scarlet is a new musical based on Nathaniel Hawthorne's The Scarlet Letter, featuring Portland favorites Susannah Mars, Isaac Lamb, Darius Pierce, Dana Green, Rebecca Teran, and many more. Join us for a performance followed by a Q&A with cast members, creator Michelle Horgen, and director Brian Weaver. Scarlet runs from Feb 28–March 25 at Portland Playhouse. For more information, please visit portlandplayhouse.org.

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  • Anna Quinn

    Nora Brown teaches high school English and lives a quiet life in Seattle with her husband and six-year-old daughter. But one November day, moments after dismissing her class, a girl's face appears above the students' desks — “a wild numinous face with startling blue eyes, a face floating on top of …

    Nora Brown teaches high school English and lives a quiet life in Seattle with her husband and six-year-old daughter. But one November day, moments after dismissing her class, a girl's face appears above the students' desks — “a wild numinous face with startling blue eyes, a face floating on top of shapeless drapes of purples and blues where arms and legs should have been. Terror rushes through Nora's body — the kind of raw terror you feel when there's no way out, when every cell in your body, your entire body, is on fire — when you think you might die.” Twenty-four hours later, while on Thanksgiving vacation, the face appears again. Shaken and unsteady, Nora meets with neurologists and, eventually, a psychiatrist. As the story progresses, a terrible secret is discovered — a secret that pushes Nora toward an even deeper psychological breakdown. Anna Quinn’s breathtaking debut novel examines the impact of traumatic childhood experiences and the fragile line between past and present. Exquisitely nuanced and profoundly intimate, Night Child (Blackstone) is a story of resilience, hope, and the capacity of the mind, body, and spirit to save itself despite all odds.

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  • Andrew Keen in Conversation With Marshall Kirkpatrick

    From “the Christopher Hitchens of the Internet” comes the new rulebook for navigating our digital age — and its future. Former Internet entrepreneur Andrew Keen was among the earliest to write about the dangers that the Internet poses to our culture and society. His 2007 book, The Cult of the Amateur,…

    From “the Christopher Hitchens of the Internet” comes the new rulebook for navigating our digital age — and its future. Former Internet entrepreneur Andrew Keen was among the earliest to write about the dangers that the Internet poses to our culture and society. His 2007 book, The Cult of the Amateur, was critical in helping advance the conversation around the Internet, which has now morphed from a tool providing efficiencies and opportunities for consumers and business to an elemental force that is profoundly reshaping our societies and our world. In How to Fix the Future (Atlantic Monthly), Keen focuses on what we can do about this seemingly intractable situation. Powerful, urgent, and deeply engaging, How to Fix the Future vividly depicts what we must do if we are to try to preserve human values in an increasingly digital world, and what steps we might take as societies and individuals to make the future something we can again look forward to. Keen will be joined in conversation by Marshall Kirkpatrick, Director of Influencer Marketing at marketing technology company Sprinklr.

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