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Omnivore

Ebola is not a weapon

Lawrence O. Gostin and Eric Friedman (Georgetown): Ebola: A Crisis in Global Health Leadership. From Cultural Anthropology, a series of articles on Ebola in perspective. Alex Tsakiridis on an analysis of the 2014 Ebola outbreak in West Africa, from the point of view of disaster studies. Carl Bialik on an important indicator in the fight against Ebola. The Ebola outbreak is not just a human tragedy — it’s also an economic one. “In 1976 I discovered Ebola — now I fear an unimaginable tragedy”:


Paper Trail

Mark Sarvas’s The Elegant Variation, started in 2003, was one of the original and most popular book blogs. After his novel Harry, Revised was published in 2008, Sarvas stepped away from the blog, but according to a new post, TEV is back, in a slightly different format. “I’ve been attracted to and inspired by the

Syllabi

Sextet

Michael Barron"Writing about music," the saying goes, "is like dancing about architecture." If it's meant to dissuade, the warning has gone unheeded: Over the years, a number of novels about music have ingeniously

Daily Review

Bad Paper: Chasing Debt from Wall Street to the Underworld

With a nod to Elmore Leonard, Bad Paper seeks a bit of love for certain bad or not-so-nice people—the hundreds of debt collectors, some of them ex-cons, who chase down little old ladies on Social Security to cough up their last pennies to pay off the money they borrowed from the likes of Bank of America or Chase. But the marks aren't really paying off the banks. No, the banks long ago sold off these debts to debt buyers like the heroes of this picaresque nonfiction yarn:

Interviews

Eula Biss

As Eula Biss began investigating immunity and public health, her interest moved from the question of fear to the question of how to move past it, and into a discussion of social ethics and care: What does an individual body—scared or not—owe the collective body?

Cinema

Film as Film: The Collected Writings of Gregory J. Markopoulos

Rebekah Rutkoff

A key figure in the New American Cinema of the 1960s, Gregory J.Markopoulos made ambitious films starting in the late ’40s, complex psychodramas and romantic meditations that used symbolic color and rapid montage. For Markopoulos, the delicate and, in his words, “divine” potential of film was too easily damaged when the artist ceded screening responsibility to curators and institutions with their own priorities, both financial and

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