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Omnivore

#ReadyForHillary?

From The Monkey Cage, Andrew Gelman on how empty platitudes grease the wheels of political reporting: It's easy to make a claim such as “The 2008 Democratic race made both Obama and Clinton better”, but what does it mean? Jamelle Bouie on Obama’s gift to Hillary Clinton: No modern-day president has left his potential successor a less scandal-plagued legacy than Barack Obama. Outside of the immediate Clinton family, few people are as thrilled by the former Secretary of State’s bid as white Democrats


Paper Trail

The Pulitzer Prizes awards will be announced today, starting at 3pm. You can watch the announcements live here.  An internal review has revealed that Buzzfeed editors have, on three occasions, deleted articles on the site that criticized the products major advertisers. According to a memo sent to staff members, the posts took aim at Pepsi,

Syllabi

Coming of Age

Leigh SteinI came of age online in the late '90s. Some of the friends I made on listservs and LiveJournal at the time are still friends today, in "real life." I was blogging and keeping a diary online years before

Daily Review

The Dead Lands

Mass death and destruction are unfortunate, but fiction writers find them nifty all the same. And if the last few years have seen an especially strong renaissance of apocalyptic literature, Benjamin Percy's impressive new outing, The Dead Lands, takes the form into its mannerist phase. Loosely adapting Lewis and Clark's journey west, the book opens in what was once St. Louis. A century and a half have passed since humanity was ravaged by a pandemic.

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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