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Omnivore

The American landscape

From National Review, taking risks, building the West: Cyrus McCormick, his invention, and his entrepreneurial spirit changed America. What does it take for heroin to grab hold in the small, remote towns of America? Consider the case of Laramie, Wyoming. Kelly Williams Brown on the Queens of the West: Horses, rhinestones, spurs, and heartbreak — the journey to be Miss Rodeo America. Bibbi Abruzzini on the wagon man of America. The Grand Canyon is already overrun with tourist infrastructure; two


Paper Trail

Without direct reference to the New Republic or its attack on him, Cornel West has responded on Facebook, noting the many reasons aside from sour grapes that one might have for criticising an American president (see today’s headlines for one example), and writing that “character assassination is the refuge of those who hide and conceal

Syllabi

Great Works About Raising Kids with Mental Illness

Natasha Vargas-CooperThe greatest fear I harbor about having kids is that I will, as Philip Larkin puts it in "This Be the Verse," fuck them up. I will fuck them up in some imperceptible way at first and there will be big

Daily Review

The Fine Art of Fucking Up

Is the phrase "a farce set in art school" redundant? Cate Dicharry's first novel takes that view, and while this position could easily be insufferable as well as unnecessary—hitting the broad side of a barn is not exactly a daring challenge—she makes it an unvarnished delight. This is an especially wise authorial move given how well-worked a genre the campus novel is—and how brave or even foolhardy it is to follow the likes of Kingsley Amis, Mary McCarthy, and Randall Jarrell.

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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