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Omnivore

Of the modern city

The inaugural issue of the Journal of Urban Cultural Studies is out. Krzysztof Nawratek (Plymouth): Carl Schmitt’s and Jacob Taubes’ Guide for Urban Revolution. Jonathan S. Davies (De Montfort): Coercive Cities: Reflections on the Dark Side of Urban Power in the 21st Century. Theresa Enright (Toronto): Global Regimes of Metromobility. Mahvish Shami (LSE) and Hadia Majid (LUMS): The Political Economy of Public Goods Provision in Slums. Michelle Wilde Anderson (UC-Berkeley): The New Minimal Cities


Paper Trail

Following the sale of the Canada-based scientific publication Experimental & Clinical Cardiology to New York buyers who turned around and sold it to a group in Switzerland that nobody can seem to identify, the journal is “now publishing anything submitted along with a fee of $1,200, packaging spurious studies as serious scientific papers.” At the

Syllabi

Weird Sex

Vanessa RovetoThere's good sex and there's bad sex. And then there's weird sex—a Freudian purgatory that somehow neither stimulates the libido nor inhibits it. In art and life, we're inclined to seek out pleasure

Daily Review

Your Face in Mine: A Novel

Row's brilliant new novel pursues a bold and roomy premise: What if you could change your race? Not superficially, with makeup and a wig, but by cosmetic surgery? This book feels new not only because it inverts and biologizes racial passing, but also because it takes seriously the last few decades of identity politics.

Interviews

Yelena Akhtiorskaya

Most extraordinary about Yelena Akhtiorskaya's first novel, Panic in a Suitcase, is the language, which can dive in and out of the consciousness of multiple characters in the space of a sentence. Akhtiorskaya writes about Russian immigrants who fail to fully embrace their new country. Often, they dream about returning, or at least about taking a vacation.

Miscellaneous

Whatever Happened to St. Petersburg?

Greg Afinogenov

Catriona Kelly’s Petersburg: Shadows of the Past takes the city’s marginal and offbeat local culture not as a fall from grace but as an opportunity. Despite its foreboding subtitle, the book ventures into this least heroic period of the city’s life—from 1945 to the present—with the briskness of a government inspector.

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