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Omnivore

Performing life in the Caribbean

Alfred G. Cuzan (West Florida): Fidel Castro: A Machiavellian Prince? Erica Goode on how Cuba’s environmental concerns grow with prospect of U.S. presence. Scott Beyer on Havana, Cuba, the city of scarcity, and on how stagnation doesn’t preserve cities, nor does wealth destroy them. Justin Elliott, ProPublica, and Laura Sullivan on how the Red Cross raised half a billion dollars for Haiti ­and built six homes. Celso Perez on the Dominican Republic’s tortured relationship with its Haitian minority.


Paper Trail

If you missed the translation of Die Zeit’s interview with Thomas Piketty, the economist and author of last year’s somewhat unlikely blockbuster Capital in the Twenty-First Century, then it looks as if you really have missed it (for now, it has been taken down from Medium for copyright reasons). Piketty accuses Germany of hypocrisy in

Syllabi

The Literature of Obsolescence

Casey Michael HenryWilliam Gaddis, the author perhaps most concerned with the entropic decay of older systems and organizational principles in fiction, famously taught a class at Bard College in 1979 on "The Literature

Daily Review

Modern Romance

Once I went to a party at Aziz Ansari’s house. This was the first and only time I’d been invited to a celebrity party, but I tried to play it cool. I brought two friends and a bottle of decent bourbon. When we walked in the door, I instantly regretted bringing the

Interviews

Maggie Nelson

Maggie Nelson is the only serious and literary person I've encountered whose speech is filled with more "you knows" than mine. Unlike mine, perhaps, her verbal tic is not so much a crutch as a helping hand: she'll be saying something fast, brilliant, and thoughtful, and maybe you don't totally get it, but when she says "you know," she allows you to feel as if you do.

Video

Shaun Usher: "Letters of Note" | Talks at Google

Miscellaneous

"Force Majeure," Karl Ove Knausgaard, and the Disease of Manhood

Dan Duray

Sweden has produced two of the most powerful contemporary renderings of manhood as a disease, as a sickness that contaminates the nuclear family. Force Majeure, directed by Ruben Ostund, addressed the modern family and its masculine saboteurs more directly than any other film last year. And then of course there's My Struggle, Karl Ove Knausgaard's epic inventory of one man's failures as a husband and a father.

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