Advertisement

Omnivore

On race relations in America

Cedric Herring and Loren Henderson (Maryland): Wealth Inequality in Black and White: Cultural and Structural Sources of the Racial Wealth Gap. Jared Bernstein on what racial injustice looks like in America’s economy. Affluent and black, and still trapped by segregation: Why well-off black families end up living in poorer areas than white families with similar or even lower incomes. Esther Canty-Barnes on how racial inequality starts early — in preschool. Sigal Alon on how diversity destroyed


Paper Trail

President Barack Obama will be the guest-editor of Wired’s November issue, on the subject of “Frontiers.” “When the Founders wrote the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution, they were at the bleeding edge of Enlightenment philosophy and technology,” said Wired editor in chief Scott Dadich. “We want to wrestle with the idea of how today’s

Syllabi

Reforming the Racist Criminal Justice System

John MiddletonThroughout the Democratic primaries, police brutality and systematic discrimination in the criminal justice system have become critical campaign issues, due in large part to the unrelenting pressure

Daily Review

New books about race in America

A FEW WEEKS BEFORE these books landed on my desk, an urgently worded missive arrived in my in-box. A group calling itself Writers on Trump was circulating an open letter to the American people that they hoped other writers would sign in support. “Because, as writers,

Interviews

Jesmyn Ward

James Baldwin's 1963 work, The Fire Next Time, with its forward-glancing title, was the call; The Fire This Time, a collection of essays and poems edited by Jesmyn Ward, is the response. Featuring the work of contemporary, mostly black writers, it finds a way to touch on many subjects.

Video

Michael Ian Black | A Child's First Book of Trump

Roundtable

The Art of Advice-Giving

Lidija Haas

Advice is so much more enjoyable to give than it is to receive that its long flourishing as a genre—from the conduct books and periodicals of the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries to the current plethora of columns, livechats, and podcasts—could seem mysterious. Of course, watching other people being told what to do might be the most fun of all, which surely helps account for the enduring appeal of the advice column.

Advertisement