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Omnivore

Why is Trump so

From Konturen, a special issue on Triumph of the Will: A New Era in American Politics, including Jeffrey S. Librett (Oregon): Sovereignty and the Cult of Immediacy; Dawn Marlan (Oregon): “Broad-Shouldered” Rhetoric: The Trump Era and the Peculiar Contempt for Words; and Sonja Boos (Oregon): No Joke: Trump and Humor. William Mazzarella (Chicago): Brand(ish)ing the Name, or, Why is Trump So Enjoyable. A recipe for coping in Trump’s America: Randle Browning reviews The Dangerous Case of Donald Trump:


Paper Trail

New York Times deputy publisher A.G. Sulzberger will take over as publisher of the paper starting next year. He succeeds his father, Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr., who will serve as chairman of the New York Times Company. The younger Sulzberger, who headed the team that created the paper’s “innovation report” three years ago, said that

Syllabi

"We Are Revolution": Introducing Asia's Proletarian Lit

Matt TurnerDuring the last election cycle, the American working class got a lot of airplay. Donald Trump’s rhetoric was a throwback to a different era of politics and a different economy. Talk of American workers

Daily Review

Ballad of a Wounded Man

I’d long had it in the back of my mind to write something about Clancy Sigal, which according to my notes I’d provisionally titled “The Man Who Fascinated Women (Writers).” Whatever it is in me that’s drawn to wounded men—and Clancy was a great one of the species

Interviews

Tony Tulathimutte and Malcolm Harris

I met author Tony Tulathimutte at a reading in Manhattan where he asked the audience to vote on which section of his novel Private Citizens to read from: the one on writer’s workshops or the one on pornography. Porn won, and Tony delivered a complex, funny, and disturbing passage. Later, when I saw his blurb recommending Malcolm Harris’s new study, Kids These Days: Human Capital and the Making of Millennials, I read the book and was impressed by its sweeping socio-economic critique.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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