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Omnivore

Rewriting the music

Dan Rager (Cleveland State): The Evolution and Antithesis of Western Music. Jason Parham, Kiese Laymon, Julianne Escobedo Shepherd, Clover Hope, and Matthew McKnight explore the state of black liberation music released in the last year. When pop broke up with jazz: Robert Siegel interviews Ben Yagoda, author of The B-Side: The Death of Tin Pan Alley and the Rebirth of the Great American Song. Marion Jacobson on the rise and fall (and rise) of the ukulele. The hunting of Billie Holiday: Johann


Paper Trail

The Washington Post‘s Tehran correspondent Jason Rezaian, who’s been in prison in Iran since July, is now facing formal charges, including espionage. Pulitzers were just announced—winners include Elizabeth Kolbert for The Sixth Extinction and Anthony Doerr for All the Light We Cannot See. Michael Eric Dyson has attempted a demolition job on Cornel West in

Syllabi

Utopian Fiction

J. C. HallmanThe history of utopian literature is very nearly the history of civilization. Lewis Mumford claimed in The City in History that the original utopias—those of Plato and Aristotle—were a reaction to

Daily Review

The Dead Lands

Mass death and destruction are unfortunate, but fiction writers find them nifty all the same. And if the last few years have seen an especially strong renaissance of apocalyptic literature, Benjamin Percy's impressive new outing, The Dead Lands, takes the form into its mannerist phase. Loosely adapting Lewis and Clark's journey west, the book opens in what was once St. Louis. A century and a half have passed since humanity was ravaged by a pandemic.

Interviews

Sarah Manguso

Sarah Manguso's latest book, Ongoingness: The End of a Diary, ostensibly about the eight-hundred-thousand-word journal she kept for twenty-five years, is in essence an act of withholding. On most pages, a few paragraphs or lines of text are surrounded by white space—precise moments suspended in the mass of formless, unrecorded time.

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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