Advertisement

Omnivore

Revamped for changing times

From Fletcher Security Review, Alexander Tabarrok (George Mason) and Alex Nowrasteh (Cato): Privateers! Their History and Future. Eyal Zamir (HUJ): Cognitive Psychology, Commonsense Morality, and the Law. Elyse Platt (Queen’s): What Makes the Good Life Good? A Comparison Between Ancient and Contemporary Conceptions of Pleasure and Eudaimonia. Mahrad Almotahari (UIC) and Adam Hosein (Colorado): Is Anything Just Plain Good? Jonathan Chait on why Benjamin Netanyahu lost his mind. G-Men as literary


Paper Trail

John Leggett, who directed the Iowa Writers’ Workshop for sixteen years (1971 to 1987), has died at the age of ninety-seven. Among the students he admitted during his long tenure at the program were T. C. Boyle, Michael Cunningham, Denis Johnson, and Jane Smiley. The director of news at Al Jazeera English, Salah Negm, says

Syllabi

Andre Dubus's best characters

Bibi DeitzAndre Dubus's literary superpower is to hit upon that one thing about a character that makes him him, or her her. And in so doing, with subtle, clever details—breadcrumbs on the trail to the nucleus

Daily Review

Severed: A History of Heads Lost and Heads Found

Humans are easy to decapitate: Our large heads rest on little necks. Most mammals have thick muscles joining the shoulders with the base of the skull; ours are so slender that our spines show through the skin. It is the price tag of standing upright, of casting off the hominid hunch.

    Interviews

    Miranda July

    In Miranda July's films and short stories, the protagonist is usually shut off from the world: insular, habit-prone, and to the outside world, a little weird, The beauty of Cheryl Glickman, the narrator of July's debut novel, The First Bad Man, is that she's come to see her idiosyncrasies as totally logical, After reading several pages of Cheryl's chatty internal monologue, the reader will, too.

    Appreciation

    On Cortázar

    Becca Rothfeld

    Reading Hopscotch—reading Julio Cortázar—is a bit like navigating a labyrinth. Behind each corner, each chapter doubling back on itself, lurks the prospect of an unforeseen encounter, at once disturbing and tantalizing. Distances are distorted. Ostensible shortcuts will lead you on a scenic route that provides alternate, unexpected perspectives. All the while, Cortázar’s work invokes a sort of Zeno’s Paradox.

    Advertisement