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Omnivore

Not invisible

Ori Aronson (Bar-Ilan): The Next Forty Presidents (“A thought experiment in feminist constitutionalism, this Essay explores a radical argument: allow only women to be elected as the next forty U.S. presidents”). Behind the “boring” German election are four deeply disturbing trends (and more and more and more). Federico Finchelstein on Venezuela’s warning to America: Beware the populist-turned-dictator. Norway’s massive wealth fund hits US$1 trillion in value. Who is the New York Timeswoeful


Paper Trail

The National Book Foundation has announced its 5 Under 35 honorees, all of whom are women. Lesley Nneka Arimah, Halle Butler, Zinzi Clemmons, Leopoldine Core, and Weike Wang will each receive $1,000. “At a moment in which we are having the necessary conversations surrounding the underrepresentation of female voices, it’s a thrill to see this

Syllabi

Women in Rock (Criticism)

Quinn Moreland Rock criticism has long been kind to a certain species of (male) character: wannabe experts who are prone to ranting and/or raving and proudly displaying their knowledge of niche subjects. It’s hard

Daily Review

Afterglow (a dog memoir)

In the first chapter of Eileen Myles’s Afterglow (a dog memoir), we learn that the author’s pit bull Rosie, whom Myles chose in 1990 from a street litter and cared for until her death sixteen years later, was not always pleased with her owner. Leaving the apartment for

Interviews

Lucy Ives

Lucy Ives was supposed to be writing her dissertation when Stella Krakus, the main character in Ives’s debut novel, Impossible Views of the World, came into her mind, It would take six years for Stella to fully emerge, but when she did, she brought an unlikely triumvirate of irrepressible qualities: a nerd’s expertise in maps and early Americana, a kooky and misanthropic sense of self, and a gimlet eye for the art world in which she seems surprised to have found herself.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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