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Omnivore

Antifa in theory

Here’s everything you need to know about the antifa network that’s trying to solidify a Nazi-punching movement. Diana Johnstone on antifa in theory and in practice. “Antifa isn’t a hobby or a fad”: Sarah Jones interviews Mark Bray, author of Antifa: The Anti-Fascist Handbook. In month after Charlottesville, papers spent as much time condemning anti-Nazis as Nazis. White nationalists are trying to “dox” every antifa activist they can. Antifa has a rapid response team that targets alt-Right


Paper Trail

Richard Wilbur—who won two Pulitzer Prizes and a National Book Award and served as the second US Poet Laureate—has died at age ninety-six. In 1957, the poet and critic Randall Jarrell wrote that Wilbur’s poem “A Baroque Wall-Fountain in the Villa Sciarra” was “one of the most marvelously beautiful, one of the most nearly perfect

Syllabi

Women in Rock (Criticism)

Quinn Moreland Rock criticism has long been kind to a certain species of (male) character: wannabe experts who are prone to ranting and/or raving and proudly displaying their knowledge of niche subjects. It’s hard

Daily Review

Sing, Unburied, Sing

Faulkner had Yoknapatawpha County and Jesmyn Ward has Bois Sauvage—neither real, both true. Faulkner reimagined Lafayette County, in the northern half of Mississippi, while Ward has used Bois Sauvage in three novels to stand in for the small towns of the Mississippi Gulf

Interviews

Lucy Ives

Lucy Ives was supposed to be writing her dissertation when Stella Krakus, the main character in Ives’s debut novel, Impossible Views of the World, came into her mind, It would take six years for Stella to fully emerge, but when she did, she brought an unlikely triumvirate of irrepressible qualities: a nerd’s expertise in maps and early Americana, a kooky and misanthropic sense of self, and a gimlet eye for the art world in which she seems surprised to have found herself.

Video

Bookforum: “False Starts”

Conversation

A Broken Story: Jenny Erpenbeck's Refugee Novel

John Domini

Overseas, Jenny Erpenbeck’s latest novel has carried her to fresh levels of acclaim. She’s won not only the Thomas Mann Prize, in her native Germany, but also Italy’s Strega Europeo, something of a Booker for the Continent. Now the book is out in this country, under the title Go, Went, Gone, and though Erpenbeck’s four previous have won critical esteem—the New York Review of Books deemed her last novel “ferocious as well as virtuosic”—here,

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