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Omnivore

The once and future island

From Island Studies Journal, a special issue on Island Cities. Alison Mountz (Wilfrid Laurier): Political Geography II: Islands and Archipelagos. Mark A. Moberg (South Alabama): Certification and Neoliberal Governance: Moral Economies of Fair Trade in the Eastern Caribbean. Martin Delgado, Zuzanna Koltowska, Felix Madrazo and Sofia Saavedra on touring the cruise industry of the Caribbean. “De beach belong to we”: Christine Toppin-Allahar on socio-economic disparity and islanders’ rights of


Paper Trail

The New York Times is restructuring its daily meetings to prioritize digital content ahead of the print paper. Executive editor Dean Baquet told the staff that print is still pretty important, though:  “Page One, and the print newspaper, remain a crucial part of what we do. . . . Our increased emphasis on digital publishing

Syllabi

The Nicholson Baker Course

J.C. HallmanWhen I starting reading Nicholson Baker, so as to write my homage, B & Me: A True Story of Literary Arousal, I quickly grew concerned, because Baker's many writerly interests got all jumbled up in my

Daily Review

It Starts with Trouble: William Goyen and the Life of Writing

The piney backwoods of East Texas might be the unlikeliest place on earth to produce a writer like William Goyen. He escaped via the navy, and he might have easily become an artist who left home and never looked back. Instead, that "bewitched" landscape loomed large. "All serious art celebrates mystery, perhaps," Joyce Carol Oates once wrote, "but Goyen's comes close to embodying it."

Interviews

Dale Peck

Dale Peck is not known for understatement. His reviews, collected under the title Hatchet Jobs, earned him a reputation as one of the most scathing critics of his generation's revered literary voices. Peck's 1993 debut novel, Martin and John, was released as Fucking Martin in the UK.

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Ladies of Letterpress Panel

Essay

Dennis Cooper's Haunted HTML Novel

Paige K. Bradley

You could call Dennis Cooper's new HTML novel, Zac’s Haunted House, many things: net art, a glorified Tumblr, a visual novel, a mood board, or a dark night of the Internet's soul. It has just a few words—the chapter titles and a few subtitles embedded in some of the gifs—but it still very clearly belongs to Cooper’s own haunted oeuvre, capable of evoking powerful and gnarled emotions.

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