With former spokesman and ex-News of the World editor Andy Coulson arrested, Prime Minister David Cameron pledges to overhaul British media. "I believe we need a new system entirely,” Cameron asserted this morning. Slate media critic Jack Shafer, however, has a different take: “Cameron is trying to make general problem out of too-cozy press-media relations. It's his specific problem.”

As News of the World editors scramble to get their stories straight, The Guardian quizzes readers on great denials in literature.

Steve Jobs

In April, Simon & Schuster announced plans to publish Walter Isaacson’s authorized biography of Steve Jobs tentatively titled iSteve: A Book of Jobs, in 2012. Many people derided the title; now, as Philip Elmer-DeWitt reports, the book has been given a new, no-frills name: Steve Jobs. We wonder if perhaps Simon & Schuster had second thoughts because they don’t want to be associated with right-wing blogger Steve Sailer, who goes by the catchy moniker “iSteve” online. In April, Sailer angrily put out a "request for pro bono legal help," stating, “I shall defend my iSteve brand and intellectual property against infringers, especially a well-known billionaire like Mr. Jobs.”

“Pages 200 to 225 made wonderful firestarters when covered in parrafin wax”: Publishers Weekly rounds up scathing and hilarious Amazon customer reviews for several deserving books.

Propublica has enlisted Guardian editor Alan Rusbridger, New York Times investigative reporter Don Van Natta Jr., and Vanity Fair contributing editor Sarah Ellison to curate the best reporting on the News of the World scandal and closure. Meanwhile, a newly laid-off NOTW reporter shares the axed staff’s immediate plans with the New York Times: “We’re going to the pub.”

Why did Hemingway kill himself? His longtime friend and biographer A. E. Hochner hazards a theory: The FBI drove him crazy.

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