Susan Bernofsky

The hacker responsible for exposing the world to George Bush’s secret life as a painter has returned to terrorize Sex and the City author Candace Bushnell. Guccifer hacked into Bushnell’s email and Twitter accounts this week, then Tweeted a link to the first fifty pages of Bushnell’s forthcoming novel, Killing Monica. The incident also revealed how inept Bushnell and her publishers are with technology: "i know NOTHING about this but my husband thinks you can cancel a tweet but doesn't know how to do it," Bushnell's publisher wrote in an email with the subject line "emergency!"

Tin House says happy birthday to Thomas Pynchon, who turned 76 on Tuesday.

At her blog Translationista, Susan Bernofsky, best known for her translations of Robert Walser, has brought our attention to the forthcoming anthology In Translation, which includes essays by Haruki Murakami, Alice Kaplan, Elliot Weinberger, Clare Kavanagh, and others.

Even though there are glimmers of seriousness in celebrity literary imprints—Johnny Depp, for example, recently published a long-lost novel by Woody Guthrie with his imprint Infinitum, Nihil and Viggo Mortensen started his press with the goal of publishing more literary fiction—for the most part, the rise in celebrity-led book imprints is a grim sign for publishing and reading, says Alexander Nazaryan at the New Republic.

A fundraising call for Moby Dick card game has already raised $65,000 on Kickstarter, and there are still three weeks left in the campaign.

David Foster Wallace’s graduation speech “This is Water” has been adapted into a short film.

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