Fanfarlo satirizes Parisian bohemia with a light touch, far from the gothic grotesqueries and threatening chiaroscuro of Les Fleurs du Mal or the dark ironies of Le Spleen de Paris. Edward K. Kaplan's brisk new translation of this early work nicely captures the book's humor—airy but not without a certain reserved malice. Baudelaire's novella presents Cramer as "one of the last Romantics of France." We are more likely now to read him as one of the first fictional anti-heroes of nineteenth-century "decadence"—J.K. Huysmans's des Esseintes …" /> Fanfarlo satirizes Parisian bohemia with a light touch, far from the gothic grotesqueries and threatening chiaroscuro of Les Fleurs du Mal or the dark ironies of Le Spleen de Paris. Edward K. Kaplan's brisk new translation of this early work nicely captures the book's humor—airy but not without a certain reserved malice. Baudelaire's novella presents Cramer as "one of the last Romantics of France." We are more likely now to read him as one of the first fictional anti-heroes of nineteenth-century "decadence"—J.K. Huysmans's des Esseintes …" /> Fanfarlo satirizes Parisian bohemia with a light touch, far from the gothic grotesqueries and threatening chiaroscuro of Les Fleurs du Mal or the dark ironies of Le Spleen de Paris. Edward K. Kaplan's brisk new translation of this early work nicely captures the book's humor—airy but not without a certain reserved malice. Baudelaire's novella presents Cramer as "one of the last Romantics of France." We are more likely now to read him as one of the first fictional anti-heroes of nineteenth-century "decadence"—J.K. Huysmans's des Esseintes …" />