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Omnivore

First step

From Constellations, John Welsh (Helsinki): The Political Aesthetic of the British City‐State: Class Formation through the Global City. Rense Corten (Utrecht): Social Dilemmas in the Sharing Economy. Jonne Arjoranta (Jyvaskyla): How to Define Games and Why. Is computer code a foreign language? No — and high schools shouldn’t treat it that way. Tracking phones, Google is a dragnet for the police. Military drills in Arctic aim to counter Russia, but the first mission is to battle the cold. Reclaiming


Paper Trail

Carmen Maria Machado talks to Electric Literature about Carmilla, a vampire novel by J. Sheridan LeFanu that predates Dracula by two decades and is now being reissued by Lanternfish Press with an introduction by Machado. “The connection between narratives of vampires and narratives of women—especially queer women—are almost laughably obvious,” she says. “The hunger for

Syllabi

Learning from Beyoncé

Kevin AllredBeyoncé Knowles-Carter makes perfect pop songs that also lend themselves to nuanced discussion of race, gender, sexuality, class, feminism, social justice, and so much more. For the past decade, I have

Daily Review

It Gets Worse

As climate change encroaches, things will get worse. Much worse. And David Wallace-Wells, in The Uninhabitable Earth, spares no detail in explaining how.

Interviews

Nancy K. Miller

Nancy K, Miller is a veteran feminist academic—an early scholar of French feminist literature at Columbia, the first full-time tenured member of the Women’s Studies Program at Barnard College and its first director, and now Distinguished Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the CUNY Graduate Center. All of this history flows into her recent book My Brilliant Friends, a piece of hybrid autobiographical criticism about her friendships with the scholars Carolyn Heilbrun, Naomi Schor, and Diane Middlebrook.

Video

Bookforum: "Fool That I Am"

Excerpt

A Writer for Our Time

Joshua Sperling

In the mid 1970s John Berger began a new life—and a new family—in a small mountain village outside Geneva in the Haute-Savoie. He was close to fifty. At first he and Beverly Bancroft did not live in the village of Quincy itself, but up the road in an old farmhouse.

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