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Omnivore

Globalization survived populism once before

B. Peter Rosendorff (NYU): Globalization and the Erosion of Liberal Democracy. David Singh Grewal (Yale): Three Theses on the Current Crisis of International Liberalism. Amitai Etzioni (GWU): An International Order without Globalism. Right-wing populism can’t fix globalization: How yesterday’s champions of economic nationalism became today’s servants of the global elite. Globalization survived populism once before — and it can again. Brad Delong on when globalization is public enemy number one.


Paper Trail

Book deals this week: Chris Fanz, a former member of the Talking Heads, sold his memoir Remain in Love to St. Martin’s Press; and Megan Angelo, a journalist and former contributing editor to Glamour, sold her debut novel, which has been described as a combination of Station Eleven and Black Mirror, to Graydon House for

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

In a Day’s Work: The Fight to End Sexual Violence Against America’s Most Vulnerable Workers

While #MeToo has exposed the pervasiveness of sexual abuse in a handful of high-profile industries, its priorities have so far reflected broader social hierarchies, giving outsize attention to the experiences of a privileged minority. In a Day’s Work shows us what

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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