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Omnivore

Of theistic belief

David Axelrod (Montclair State): On the Likelihood of God’s Existence: An Econometric Perspective. Jonathan Jenkins Ichikawa (UBC): Faith and Epistemology. Stanislaw Judycki (Gdansk): How Do We Recognize God? The Most Important Epistemological Question of Christian Philosophy. Rene Van Woudenberg and Hans Van Eyghen (VU Amsterdam): Most Peers Don’t Believe It, Hence It Is Probably False. Jason Megill (Bentley) and Dan Linford (Purdue): On The Unimportance of Theistic Belief. Ryan Preston-Roedder


Paper Trail

Journalists from CNN, Politico, and other outlets were banned from attending an Environmental Protection Agency summit on water contaminants this week. When one CNN reporter showed their credentials and attempted to enter the conference, a security guard told them “they ain’t doing the CNN stuff,” and an Associated Press journalist was physically removed from the

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

The Space Barons: Elon Musk, Jeff Bezos, and the Quest to Colonize the Cosmos

February’s test launch of Elon Musk’s new Falcon Heavy rocket was probably the most expensive and most glorious publicity stunt in the history of advertising: flame and smoke, and then videos of the space-suited mannequin in the cherry-red Tesla Roadster, David Bowie on

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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