Advertisement

Omnivore

One path

Simon Caney (Oxford): Political Institutions for the Future: A Five-Fold Package. Raul Castro is stepping down — but he’s leaving behind a complicated legacy and an unclear future. Cuban communism is at its reform-or-die moment: The country’s first non-Castro president in over 50 years has only one path to legitimacy. Democrats have great female presidential candidates — they need to avoid the victim trap. And the newest member of Trump’s fan club is Kanye West. Michael Harriot on Kanye West,


Paper Trail

The Guardian profiles Hanya Yanagihara, the author of A Little Life and editor of T: The New York Times Style Magazine. Yanagihara says that besides health care, she decided to take a job with the Times because the collaborative nature of working at a magazine balances out the effects of working on a novel. “Fiction

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

A Neutral Innocence of the Heart

Picture the carefree swagger of a teenage white boy, shirtless and smooth, swinging himself into a pristine tree-lined body of water from a rope as if there were no history, no context, no world. Instead, simply the body and the self it manages, flying gracefully with no net, nothing to carry that body to safety but its own faith that nothing will squash it down.

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

Advertisement