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Omnivore

How we talk about fascism

Johannes Steizinger (Vienna): The Significance of Dehumanization: Nazi Ideology and Its Psychological Consequences; and National Socialism and the Problem of Relativism. From NYRB, it can happen here: Cass Sunstein reviews They Thought They Were Free: The Germans, 1933–45 by Milton Mayer and Broken Lives: How Ordinary Germans Experienced the Twentieth Century by Konrad H. Jarausch. American PR professionals helped sell the Nazi regime to the United States. George Soros is not a Nazi, explained.


Paper Trail

Being Mortal author Atul Gawande has been named CEO of Amazon, Berkshire Hathaway, and JPMorgan Chase’s joint healthcare initiative. “I have devoted my public health career to building scalable solutions for better healthcare delivery that are saving lives, reducing suffering, and eliminating wasteful spending both in the US and across the world,” Gawande said in

Syllabi

The Roots of the Alt-right

Mike WendlingDuring the last presidential election cycle, you may have read reports describing the alt-right—a loosely organized group of anti-PC, anti-feminist, race-obsessed online warriors—as a strange, newly

Daily Review

Kudos

Faye has just boarded an airplane when Kudos, the third novel in a trilogy about her middle life, begins. She boarded, after lunch with a billionaire, another airplane at the start of the first novel, Outline. She was reading a spam e-mail from an astrology service predicting “a major transit . . . in [her] sky” when the second, Transit, began. Passenger flight explains these incredible novels.

Interviews

Porochista Khakpour

Porochista Khakpour’s memoir, Sick, is a deeply powerful and harrowing odyssey through the most profound mysteries of mind and body, as Khakpour explores the roots of a chronic illness that has no clear beginning or end.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Excerpt

Excess—The Factory

Leslie Kaplan

Below is an excerpt from Leslie Kaplan's 1982 fiction of the French factory revolts. For more on the book, recently released in an English edition (translated by Julie Carr and Jennifer Pap), see Jason E. Smith's review in our special summer issue, 1968 Now.

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