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Omnivore

Democrats are suddenly competitive

Whites have fled the Democratic Party — here’s how the nation got there. Who does the Democratic Party stand for? The primary race between two Democratic candidates for governor in Georgia exposes the larger questions facing the party. Tara Golshan on the Democrats’ new “Better Deal for Our Democracy”, explained. Turning up the heat on Trump: Dems say “culture of corruption” to be focus of midterms. Democrats have finally found their midterm message. “We’re definitely seeing unbridled enthusiasm


Paper Trail

Interview magazine is shutting down after nearly fifty years. Founded by Andy Warhol in 1969, the publication has become entangled in legal challenges from former staffers who claim lost wages worth hundred of thousands of dollars, as well as a charge that the former creative director, Karl Templer, overstepped “the professional line.” The New York

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

In a Day’s Work: The Fight to End Sexual Violence Against America’s Most Vulnerable Workers

While #MeToo has exposed the pervasiveness of sexual abuse in a handful of high-profile industries, its priorities have so far reflected broader social hierarchies, giving outsize attention to the experiences of a privileged minority. In a Day’s Work shows us what

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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