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Omnivore

The president as cult leader

They spewed hate — then they punctuated it with the president’s name. People voted for Trump because they were anxious, not poor. What happens to politics when crazy has a seat at the table? The president as cult leader: Even if Trump fires Mueller or leads us into war, his supporters will still obey his every word. Trapped in the White House: Many Trump aides are too “toxic” to get jobs. How long can Trump’s long con last? Trump has exaggerated his wealth for years — in office, he’s trying a


Paper Trail

In her Medium pop-up magazine Unruly Bodies, Roxane Gay writes about her difficult decision to undergo weight reduction surgery. “I worried that people would think I betrayed fat positivity, something I do very much believe in even if I can’t always believe in it for myself. I worried that everyone who responded so generously to

Syllabi

Marriage Reimagined

Laura SmithIt is easy to view the vast and varied landscape of marriage in the present day as a radical departure from a more conservative past. But many of these marriage alternatives—including polyamory, open

Daily Review

A Neutral Innocence of the Heart

Picture the carefree swagger of a teenage white boy, shirtless and smooth, swinging himself into a pristine tree-lined body of water from a rope as if there were no history, no context, no world. Instead, simply the body and the self it manages, flying gracefully with no net, nothing to carry that body to safety but its own faith that nothing will squash it down.

Interviews

Wayne Koestenbaum

Ludwig Wittgenstein noted that in representational writing, “one thinks that one is tracing the outline of the thing’s nature . . . and one is merely tracing round the frame through which we look at it.” In Wayne Koestenbaum’s “trance journals”—The Pink Trance Notebooks (2015) and the newly released Camp Marmalade—both the frame and the off-frame are folded into his trans-perspectival impressions.

Video

Bookforum: "Bleeding Hearts"

Essay

A Poet of the Archives: On Susan Howe

Emily LaBarge

Howe has long been interested in distilling signs and symbols, whether “art objects” or words themselves, into something more revelatory. Considering riddles, lost languages, doubled surfaces, spells, magical thinking, and other elusive forms of expression, Howe sounds the depths.

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